Entertainment

All entertainment style blogs are posted here, which includes, movies, television, music, celebrity gossip.

Old School Video of The Week: Rene & Angela – “I’ll Be Good”

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The year was 1985, when the duo Rene Moore and Angela Winbush who went by the stage name simply Rene and Angela released the single, “I’ll Be Good.” which was off their final album together entitled Street Called Desire. The duo’s chemistry was savory, and it only has added to their success and they were able to maintain it for four albums in their catalogue.

It’s unfortunate that the chemistry during their performance didn’t manifest to longevity because, after their album Street Called Desire, the duo parted ways. “I’ll Be Good” reached number 4 on the R&B Billboard charts.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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The Remy Ma vs. Nicki Minaj Beef Brings Out Misogyny & Complainers

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nicki-minaj-remy-ma-2OPINION – The day Remy Ma and Nicki Minaj began throwing shade at each other; I just knew this would be a great opportunity for hip-hop in general. Not too many women on the mic are going at each other in MC Lyte versus Antoinette fashion and receiving a broader audience while doing it. I kind of miss rap beef, as long as it stayed on what we call wax. Furthermore, in this era of the genre not too many women are getting opportunities to shine and be talked about all over social media for their bars and disrespect for each other on a lyrical scale (even though the lyrics have become more sinister).

There is history concerning the beef between Remy and Minaj, that was in the making for a decade. Minaj released a mixtape back in 2007 when Remy was incarcerated entitled, Playtime Is Over. The track, “Dirty Money” over a Terror Squad beat, had many people including Remy thinking that Minaj was throwing verbal shade at her with this line:

“Tell that bitch with the crown to run it like Chris Brown,” “She won three rounds, I’mma need a hundred thou’…/Oh, y’all ain’t know? Bet y’all bitches know now.”

With the beat Minaj used and the fact that Remy won a $20,000 battle against Lady Luck, it didn’t take a genius to put two and two together. According to Remy, she stated in an interview while she was incarcerated that she confronted Minaj about it. The back and forth between the two has been brewing for quite some time, and it reached its peak in the present, where everything exploded, and social media went nuts.

With Minaj’s subliminal’s on tracks entitled, “Swalia” and with Gucci Mane’s “Make Love,” Minaj gave the appearance that she didn’t believe Remy Ma would answer her in such a fashion that it would have the internet on fire.

“Oooohhh, oh you the qu-e-e-the queen of this here?/One platinum plaque, album flopped, bitch, where?”-Nicki Minaj

Remy Ma responded less than 48 hours later with the track, “ShETHER,” which was a lyrical assault on Minaj that cause social media to explode:

“We call that Jelani, get it? Semen in your pants” and “And I got a few words for the moms of the young Barbz/Guess who supports a child molester? Nicki Minaj/You paid for your brother’s wedding? That’s hella foul/How you spending money to support a pedophile?/He a walking dead man, sending threats to him/I guess that’s why they call you Barbie, you was next to Ken/Talkin’ ‘bout your money long and your foreign sick/Why you ain’t help your bro hide his cum from forensics”.

During the social media explosion, people on social media appear to have a problem with folks discussing this rap beef. Some cited that one couldn’t possibly be “woke” (I can’t stand that word now) and talk about hip-hop beef on social media. It’s a good thing to abandoned the same Trump news, or the consistent topics of racial oppression, etc. That does not mean the person is not “woke,” so folks need to stop shaming those who want to discuss something else. Are we supposed to be a program to address social issues 24/7? Sorry, I will talk about pop culture anytime I please, but it doesn’t make me less enlighten compared to the person who isn’t discussing it. With that being said, have several forced seats.

Then some individuals also said with a straight face that Remy’s response was weak and her bars weren’t all that to be discussing. The ones that I noticed had that comment escape from their computer screens are men. Some men, especially on Facebook hip-hop groups, are saying that Remy couldn’t possibly go toe to toe with a man on a lyrical scale. This leads me to believe that jealousy and misogyny plays an immense role in the criticism and has always been a blanket part of oppression against women in hip-hop. It pains some men that the topic of discussion where it involves hip-hop was about two women (especially Black women) and not masculine induced men for once. That’s another group that needs to have a full stadium of seats. They have been the most annoying out of the bunch, but some men can’t help hiding their sheer disgusting misogyny.

Then one has the generic complainers. They are mad because their timeline is filled with the Remy and Minaj topics, but there is a feature on one’s social media with emphasis on Facebook that can hide those who are talking about it. If one doesn’t want to read about it, either change the settings or just stop logging on, one has options, so use it.

So far, the only response Minaj was able to come up with was making fun of Remy’s album sales:

“Powered by the Platinum certified ‘All The Way Up,’ Remy Ma and Fat Joe’s joint effort ‘Plato O Plomo’ debuts disappointedly at #44 on the SPS count. Its combined numbers on that chart came in at 11,158. As for the project’s pure sales debut, that figure sat at a shocking 7,978. Although, this was enough to lift its placing on sales-only chart to #25.” Nicki captioned the photo with a “Yikes” and facepalm emoji.”

Great or mediocre album sales, doesn’t constitute one is a good rapper and has lyrical skills. If that is all Minaj can muster, she failed and lost the battle already. Harping on album sales, instead of getting in the booth and exhibit some bars is an appropriate response. Bringing the beef back to social media and not coming up with a lyrical arsenal, proves that Minaj doesn’t have that much of an answer for Remy Ma’s lyrical prowess. Of course, Minaj should have known better to poke the hornet’s nest concerning Remy. I mean Remy had me thinking, I can take all your money on the “Ante Up” remix, so her lyrical influence and overall delivery have always been stellar.

With that being said, this is the type of rap beef that is needed in hip-hop, especially when women are involved. The era has been dominated by one woman, which is Minaj far too long, and other women in hip-hop can’t seem to muscle in on the genre for extended periods of time because Minaj turned the imagery and rap music involving women, more into pop music, instead of real rap. Minaj comes across as if she should be the only woman in hip-hop that should be getting shine. There was an era, where one had Eve, Lauryn and Missy all in the same fold making music without having one dominate like Apple. Minaj comes across as if she should have a monopoly in the game of hip-hop concerning women. It’s time for Minaj to get some competition and test her to see if she has a lyrical foot to stand on and by the looks of things she doesn’t. I think hip-hop fans will attest (well the older generation) that women who can rap shouldn’t come across as mediocre pop stars, and should be awarded for their lyrical skills.

If Minaj doesn’t bring an array of bars, she will continue to be known as having one great verse on “Monster” as the only thing that made folks discuss her as a rapper in her career since her mixtape days. I’m starting to think that Minaj didn’t write her verse on “Monster, ” or maybe ghostwriters did all the work for her, and now she is being exposed as she has already been known for as just a gimmick rapper. The average rap fan has changed nevertheless, and may not care about lyrical delivery. That may save Minaj, but fans who respect artists who can deliver bars, write their lyrics will get the love from fans who aren’t easily swayed by gimmicks.

So let’s stop complaining because people are giving the appearance that they aren’t enlightened because we took a break from social issues for once and focused on the Remy and Minaj rap beef. Let’s stop showing our misogynistic behinds because we aren’t talking about the men in hip-hop for once (didn’t we talk about the Drake and Meek’s beef?). Allow this beef to manifest itself for as long as possible, as long as it stays non-violent. It’s good for hip-hop, and it allows those in the genre with an emphasis on women to step their game up or fade into obscurity because they can’t handle the weight, and that’s what rap fans deserve, where old schoolers like Lyte would be immensely proud.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Knicks Owner James Dolan Treated Charles Oakley, Like Donald Trump Would

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  Charles-Oakley OPINION – As a lifetime Knicks fan (yes, I know I have issues for continuing to be a Knick fan) the events that led up to retired Knicks player Charles Oakley has resulted in one of the darkest movements in Knicks history under owner James Dolan’s regime.

From the facts that were presented, Oakley walked into the stands at Madison Square Garden (had verifiable tickets), in his usually immaculate style of dress, in a suit that cost more than my monthly rent. Four minutes into the Knick game a few security guards approached Oakley at his seat and asked him to leave.

From various sources, Dolan was seated a few rows ahead of Oakley and didn’t want him in attendance. The request by MSG security resulted into a shoving match between Oakley and security, which also led to a few officers pushing Oakley out of the arena (not before he pushed them off of him like they were mere little bugs), and subsequently resulted in his arrest.

After Oakley was arrested, the Knicks released a statement via Twitter, but the words they used, implied that Oakley is the sole catalyst as to why he was removed in the first place and that he has underlining issues.

The Knicks released a statement calling Oakley’s behavior, “highly inappropriate and completely abusive. …He was a great Knick and we hope he gets some help soon.”

Dolan has always treated Oakley like he never been a Knick or is not a ten year veteran of a franchise that got to the NBA Finals and played great basketball in the 1990’s.  Dolan has decline to extend an invitation to Oakley to participate in the anniversary of the Knicks franchise, regardless of what he contributed in the years he was with the organization. By Dolan summoning his toy soldiers to remove a man because he has often spoken negatively about a joke of a franchise this team has been since Dolan was given the Knicks as a toy reminds me of Donald Trump. Anytime Trump is criticized he throws tantrums and kicks people out. Trump has done it at his rallies and freezes individual media outlets when they don’t agree with him.

I often wonder, if Oakley wasn’t Black, would Dolan have his artificial intelligence security guards escort Oakley out in such an embarrassing fashion? When I bring this up, I often here: “well Dolan loves other Black players, he gave them jobs.” Save that attempt at trying to make Dolan appear to be a man of unbiased integrity, that’s like saying, he can’t possibly be racist, I have Black friends. Trump also appointed Ben Carson as Housing Secretary, and other Black people so I rest my case. As long as ex-Knick players know their place and don’t criticize Dolan he loves them, so to me, this was a move to put the Black guy (Oakley) in his place.

I wish after Oakley was kicked out, that the majority of the fans would have exited, but of course paying for those expensive Knick tickets to watch a clown of a team is hard to do in New York City. What should take place is that every New York Knick legend should turn down every future invitation to assist this franchise with an event in the future. The former players should boycott this organization until Dolan is forced to give up his toy, which is the New York Knicks and fade to obscurity.

How can any future free agent(s) be attracted to this dismal franchise, when an owner treats their legends like they did Oakley and a GM in Phil Jackson that goes on Twitter assaults criticizing and throwing their star player under the bus? It’s time for Dolan to sell this franchise, this is the last straw. The Knicks organization is one if not the only sports franchise that is a sheer disgrace. Some NBA players have already voiced their displeasure on how Oakley was treated and with criticism that should be a warning sign for potential free agents, to not even bother with this joke of an organization.

Will I continue to watch this team for the rest of the season, probably not? The thought of even wishing this team well, makes me want to regurgitate. It has reached a point that I hope superstars decline to come to this organization because how they treat their veterans, especially a veteran like Charles Oakley who was the toughest Knick in the building that night, which we haven’t seen in years speaks volumes.

Boycott the Knicks, if one is a Knicks fan because one is better off until their entire foundation changes (from ownership and management) and the word class is replaced instead of the trash that we are subjected too, on and off the court.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Mic Geronimo – “It’s Real”

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Mic G

The year was 1994 when Mic Geronimo released the single, “It’s Real”, which is the censored version of “Shits Real” off his debut album The Natural. 1994 was an extensive year for hip-hop and argumentatively one of the best years of the genre.

Mic Geronimo not only contributed to hip-hop in that year, but he also gave us a glimpse of a man who would take over Murder Inc. Records by the likes of Irv Gotti, who produced “It’s Real.” Other artists would be featured, on Mic Geronimo’s The Natural album like DMX, Ja-Rule, Jay-Z to name a few.

It’s unfortunate that Mic Geronimo didn’t have the commercial success of the other artists I mentioned who contributed on his album, but he should still be remembered as a rapper who added his own to the Golden Age of Hip-Hop and will forever be part of that history.

Ms. Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Wait A Minute, Some Are Still Dragging Mariah Carey?

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OPINION – It has been a few days since Mariah Carey’s dreadful performance during New Year’s Eve that left those who watched it horrified at how Carey’s vintage and accomplished voice appeared to be noticeably absent. Well, Carey’s camp is blaming technical problems that the show producers were allegedly aware of at the time. Carey’s camp also stated that ABC continued with the technical failures for ratings. Here is part of what Carey’s manager Stella Bulochnikov said:

“I will never know the truth, but I do know that we told them three times that her mike pack was not working and it was a disastrous production,” Ms. Bulochnikov told Us Weekly magazine on Sunday. “I’m certainly not calling the F.B.I. to investigate. It is what it is: New Year’s Eve in Times Square. Mariah did them a favor. She was the biggest star there, and they did not have their” act together.

Social media is having a field day and are still dragging Carey to hell and back for the mishap. I read Carey is now irrelevant and that her career is over and she needs to retire. Then I saw a meme (because that is what a lot of people on social media like to do nowadays). The person posted a picture of Mariah Carey, and Ariana Grande (who I am not a fan of due to her shady character issues) who’s powers were stolen by Grande, and now she reigns supreme.

I am going to be honest, I was never a fan of Carey as a person maybe because I always thought she was too much of a diva. I did enjoy her receipts, you know her music, which catalog spans a total of 18 number one hit songs, (which leads all current solo artists in the present) in case one lost count. Furthermore, she has over 200 million records sold nationwide, 5 Grammy awards, and other stellar accolades. Yes, I brought receipts to the party because by the looks of things folks forgot all about that tidbit because creating a dragging session without receipts is disingenuous to me.

Carey’s accomplishments, always seem to be diminished and ignored by social media when an artists make a mistake or do not perform like their receipts. Some of us never take that into consideration, before salivating at the mouth to demean artists when they slip up and not perform up to their past success. Some can’t wait to make fun of one’s failures, just for the sake of social media high fives (likes, re-tweets). Unwarranted dragging is the new age of social media, where no matter how much successful things one has accomplished, that is ignored when the lights are dimmed, and the clapping cease. Receipts are shredded or thrown in the trash like they never existed. Unless the artists are no longer here in the physical, then we see all the tributes and saying how they were the storybook of their lives when they were growing up, and how they will miss them.

After the horrific year, we had in 2016, with some of the great voices that have left us. Maybe we need to celebrate the living and their accomplishments, while they are still here instead of celebrating their failures with social media pitchforks, gathering friends and family to perform a dragging session as part of one own psychological way of feeling good about themselves when others fail.

I have participated in my share of dragging celebrities (hi Kim Burrell), but mostly it is to place a foot on their necks via social media for problematic things they say or do that is detrimental to my community. Some of us get off at dragging celebrities, rather than highlight their past accomplishments until they are no longer here. We love to do this, but I often wonder those who are dragging Mariah Carey have ever failed in life, who also have receipts of past accomplishments (resumes, degrees), but are fortunate because those who witness their failures aren’t millions of television watchers and social media pundits.

So, don’t worry Mariah; I can’t believe I’m saying this, but I got your back. I kept a copy of your receipts, for a rainy day, just in case folks forgot what you have done and not wait until you are no longer here to hear the applause. I like to celebrate those in the present, rather than wait until those who have transitioned; we should all try it sometimes and that goes for everyone, celebrity or not.

-Ms. Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: George Michael & Mary J. Blige – “As”

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With another shocking loss to the 80’s icons, this time with the departure of George Michael on Christmas Day has left the world stunned. Michael passed away at the age of 53 years old and is added to the list of many artists who have passed on at such a young age in 2016.

George Michael was a prolific singer and songwriter who dominated the majority of the 80’s with his group Wham and as a solo artist, where he became even more successful. I can say that Michael was another artist that was part of my teenage musical years. With intoxicating good looks and sex appeal to coincide with some of the lyrics, George Michael was the full package as one of the most high-profile heartthrobs of the 80’s.

The year was 1999 when George Michael and Mary J. Blige covered Stevie Wonder’s “As.” The song on Michael’s greatest hits album, entitled Ladies & Gentlemen: The Best of George Michael. Michael and Blige’s chemistry was like the rest of the duets Michael has created with legendary artists like Aretha Franklin and the late Whitney Houston. The blue-eyed soul singer and Blige with their many doppelgangers singing in the club, was one of the highlights in the video.

Unfortunately, in the United States “As” did not get exposure due to Michael’s legal issues, when he got arrested for attempting a lewd act in L.A. Even though we can consider that entrapment, but I’ll digress. Even with the lack of marketing for the song in the states, “As” reached the top 5 in the U.K to make up for it.

In closing, George Michael will not only be missed, but the blueprint he left behind in the industry will be hard to match. George Michael had soul that didn’t come across as appropriation like other singers of the blue-eyed persuasion. Like many others who have left us this year, they left being a profound legacy and will continue to leave the floodgates to newer fans for decades to come to discover their music. Rest in peace, George Michael.

 

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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George Karl Is Blaming Absentee Fathers, Instead of His Mediocre Coaching

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kenyon-and-georgeOPINION – There are always occasions when people write autobiographies and “spill the tea,” so to speak, where they highlight things that occur in their lives while blasting others in the process. In the case of former NBA coach George Karl, he attempted to do the same thing in his latest autobiography, entitled Furious George.

In the excerpt of his book, a controversial passage has made its rounds:

“Kenyon and Carmelo carried two big burdens: all that money and no father to show them how to act like a man,” Karl wrote.

Let me get this straight, in other words; Karl’s blaming his mediocre NBA record and lack of an NBA championship on his resume on Kenyon Martin and Carmelo Anthony? When does a head coach show accountability for the process of drafting X’s and O’s, motivating, putting a team together that values leadership and has stellar chemistry? I guess the easy way out, is blaming losses on Black players, who didn’t have a father figure in their lives.

I can name several NBA players, who didn’t have their fathers to guide them and they have gone on to become successful players, who also were able to win a championship and even get into the Basketball Hall of Fame. One player comes to mind is Lebron James, and countless others who have won or who have gone on to the Hall of Fame, like Allen Iverson.

Karl is playing the victim here, and his mediocrity should be scrutinized more than his players. One will never hear great NBA coaches like Greg Popovich of the San Antonio Spurs make a statement like that because I’m sure he had players who didn’t have a father figure in their lives. By the looks of things, Popovich did something that Karl didn’t do, probably didn’t care to do, or don’t know how to, and that is to become a father figure to his players if he felt that they needed it.

It also appears to me that Karl’s little excerpt that I highlighted has some racial undertones, that says that Black men can’t be successful in the NBA because their fathers aren’t around. Karl had tons of talented players at his disposal for the most part that didn’t like him. Instead of blaming that on absentee fathers, maybe George Karl needs to look at himself in the mirror.

Kenyon Martin responded on Twitter to Karl recently:

 

 

 

Then Karl used another word that is underline with racial undertones concerning J.R. Smith:

Of Smith, Karl wrote that he had “a huge sense of entitlement, a distracting posse, his eye always on the next contract and some really unbelievable shot selection.”

Most of us are quite aware the words, “posse” and “thug” are part of the covert class of racist language that is replaced instead of the N-word. No one isn’t stupid, and if one thinks otherwise one is probably being willfully ignorant to Karl’s content when talking about Black players. Karl isn’t slick at all and the more I hear his quotes, the more that I come to the conclusion he is probably a covert racist (well not covert any longer). We are no longer sugar coating this, it’s time to start blasting these racist, privilege individuals.

With a career record of 1175 wins and 824 losses and a winning percentage of .432, is not impressive.  Sure Karl has surpassed Phil Jackson in wins, but Jackson has something Karl doesn’t, which is a championship and a better winning percentage. Karl’s head coaching record is dismal, he has no NBA championships under his belt. Lastly, with his last termination by the Sacramento Kings, this should cement his legacy as a coach, who isn’t that good and utilized his white privilege to continue to yield head coaching jobs, even if his performance and record continue to be mediocre. Karl needs to stop blaming everyone else and change the title to his book from Furious George to Incompetent George: The White Privilege Edition. 

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-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Podcast Guest Appearance: The Starting 5 Show

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tmt

Once again, I made a guest appearance on Mayor Dan’s and JP’s podcast entitled, The Starting 5 Show. We discuss an array of topics, but the highlights were the murder of Joe McKnight, and the suicide of former running back Rashaan Salaam and more. Follow The Starting 5 Show at SoundCloud. You can also email the starting 5 at THESTARTING5SHOW@gmail.com and follow them on Twitter @THESTARTING5TMT and @SF_ACE5. I hope you enjoy the show.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Stephanie Mills – “Never Knew Love Like This Before”

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stephanie-mills

The year was 1980 when Stephanie Mills released the single, “Never Knew Love Like This Before” off of Mills fourth album entitled Sweet Sensation.

Mills would go on to have an illustrious career that would span over seventeen albums. Mills will garner a few number one hits, American Music Awards and Grammys along the way.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Book Review: Angie Martinez – “My Voice”

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Growing up during the golden age of hip-hop has its perks in today’s climate. I feel those who were around from the beginning of the culture appreciate the past more than ever, especially as the culture changes in the present. During my time analyzing how hip-hop culture coincides with the radio would be the most valuable tool for me as I would be introduced to new artists growing up, who would become legendary. It felt good to witness the start of  Rakim, KRS-One, and groups like Salt-n-Pepa, etc. careers and how their impact on the culture would appoint them as legends.

Besides Marley Marl’s “In Control” segment, and Red Alert “Going Berserk” on rival stations like WBLS and KISS-FM respectively, I would get a snippet of hip-hop, and it would be at certain times during the night. When Hot 97 took over the reigns of hip-hop in its entirely as the 90’s took shape, not only was I getting hip-hop during the daytime, but I was introduced to a deejay that would become the voice of New York radio in Angie Martinez.

Well, Angie Martinez documented her life in a new memoir entitled, My Voice. I would receive what I would call the behind the scenes narrative from Martinez as she interacts with various artists, during her time with the station. It also was refreshing that Martinez took us on a journey, which included her childhood, her teenage years (some of it was shocking) and her past relationships. All of these stories would give the readers a view on what led her to become one of the most recognizable deejays in New York City. It also shows how Martinez was able to manifest her brand across the United States.

Martinez also highlights her public turmoil relationship with another radio legend in Wendy Williams, in more detail. Martinez was able to give the narrative effectively concerning her physical altercation with Williams at the station. I felt like I was the unseen witness at Hot 97 when Martinez wanted to “shoot the fair one,” so to speak with Wendy Williams.

What made the book intensify was the way Martinez told the story of being awarded the opportunity to interview Tupac Shakur during his public beef with Biggie, which led to deadly consequences for both artists. Martinez would also re-enact the way she felt, during those dark times in hip-hop, which included her actions at the station upon hearing their deaths and immediately going on the radio to be with her listeners.

Then, Martinez would also give readers inside the radio walls of the Jay-Z and Nas public dispute, which would be water cooler material for months. From Jay-Z’s debut of the “Take Over” at Summer Jam to Nas’ “Ether” on the radio, there was a behind the scenes story to tell. What would stand out with the Jay and Nas situation, (which would thankfully stay on wax), was Martinez sharing what happened behind the scenes with her relationship with Nas during one of the most classic hip-hop beef of all-time.

My Voice is a page-turner, and it also gives us insight that Martinez wasn’t just due to the position of being the voice of New York City, but worked hard to reach that the level and continues to shine. The tales Martinez told concerning the station were candid and rehashed a lot of memories for me. Martinez came across as authentic and didn’t hold anything back, which I appreciated. Martinez also made sure; she told her readers that she had made mistakes on and off the radio, which adds to the authenticity of her voice. If one loves hip-hop and would love to hear how Angie Martinez became the woman that she is today and her involvement in a culture that has to stand the test of time, then this is a must read.

Rating: 5 out of 5

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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