Old School Video of The Week: Prodigy – “Keep It Thoro”

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Prodigy

“When you see me in the streets soldier, salute me. You just a groupie, oh, you gangsta, then shoot me”

The unexpected death of Prodigy at the age of 42, of the group Mobb Deep, has rattled the hip-hop communities’ nerves. It’s starting to become normalized when we lose hip-hop icons at such a young age, and it also brings once again heath awareness with an emphasis on Black men in general. The exact cause of death has yet to be determined, but it is also well known that Prodigy has been battling sickle cell disease since he was an infant.

Prodigy’s entire aura, his voice, his lyrical delivery to coincide his street tales was intoxicating and Havoc’s lyrical contribution alongside with his stellar production, meshed well with Prodigy’s persona. Mobb Deep was an important duo when they emerged in the 90’s with a New York style, which left the bubble gum rap style in its dust, but came out and gave listeners a front row seat to the heart of the dark New York streets.

I was always fascinated by Prodigy’s voice, and I would state if he was at a supermarket and simply ask the cashier if an item was on sale, they would more than likely give him the items for free. Prodigy’s voice was one of the most intimidating voices in hip-hop, and it has Queensbridge all over it. When the duo disbanded, that didn’t stop Prodigy from continuing to get busy on the mic by representing hip-hop on his terms.

The year was 2000 when Prodigy released “Keep It Thoro” off his debut solo album H.N.I.C. “Keep It Thoro” is tough, a production banger, and it represented the Prodigy that we come to know and love as a member of Mobb Deep. Once again, leaving a legacy behind is just as important when we are no longer here in the physical. Prodigy did just that, in many ways. Another fallen hip-hop legend gave us a brief time on this earth, but left an infinite legacy behind that will be quite difficult to duplicate in the future. Rest in peace.

-Ms Scripter,

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Phil Collins – “One More Night”

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Phil Collins

The year was 1984 when Phil Collins released the single “One More Night” off his album entitled No Jacket Required. No Jacket Required will be my personal introduction to Collins, but he released albums before this one that were solid. No Jacket Required, would be one of my favorite albums of the 80’s and made me an immediate and loyal fan of Collins, where researching his previous work, which includes with the group Genesis.

“One More Night,” reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard charts, and would go down as one of the successful soft-rock ballads of that decade. Phil Collins would continue to drop numerous hits after his critical acclaim album, which only solidify him as a legend.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

 

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Old School Video of The Week: George Michael & Mary J. Blige – “As”

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george-michael-mary-j-blige

With another shocking loss to the 80’s icons, this time with the departure of George Michael on Christmas Day has left the world stunned. Michael passed away at the age of 53 years old and is added to the list of many artists who have passed on at such a young age in 2016.

George Michael was a prolific singer and songwriter who dominated the majority of the 80’s with his group Wham and as a solo artist, where he became even more successful. I can say that Michael was another artist that was part of my teenage musical years. With intoxicating good looks and sex appeal to coincide with some of the lyrics, George Michael was the full package as one of the most high-profile heartthrobs of the 80’s.

The year was 1999 when George Michael and Mary J. Blige covered Stevie Wonder’s “As.” The song on Michael’s greatest hits album, entitled Ladies & Gentlemen: The Best of George Michael. Michael and Blige’s chemistry was like the rest of the duets Michael has created with legendary artists like Aretha Franklin and the late Whitney Houston. The blue-eyed soul singer and Blige with their many doppelgangers singing in the club, was one of the highlights in the video.

Unfortunately, in the United States “As” did not get exposure due to Michael’s legal issues, when he got arrested for attempting a lewd act in L.A. Even though we can consider that entrapment, but I’ll digress. Even with the lack of marketing for the song in the states, “As” reached the top 5 in the U.K to make up for it.

In closing, George Michael will not only be missed, but the blueprint he left behind in the industry will be hard to match. George Michael had soul that didn’t come across as appropriation like other singers of the blue-eyed persuasion. Like many others who have left us this year, they left being a profound legacy and will continue to leave the floodgates to newer fans for decades to come to discover their music. Rest in peace, George Michael.

 

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Samuelle – “So You Like What You See”

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soyoulikewhatyousee

 

The year was 1990 when former Club Nouveau member Samuelle released the single, “So You Like What You See,” off his debut and only album entitled, Living In Black Paradise.

“So You Like What You See” was even more popular in later years, and was featured in the video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, in 2004. Samuelle continues to perform with Club Nouveau.

Ms. Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Stephanie Mills – “Never Knew Love Like This Before”

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stephanie-mills

The year was 1980 when Stephanie Mills released the single, “Never Knew Love Like This Before” off of Mills fourth album entitled Sweet Sensation.

Mills would go on to have an illustrious career that would span over seventeen albums. Mills will garner a few number one hits, American Music Awards and Grammys along the way.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Yarbrough & Peoples “Don’t Stop The Music”

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bestofynp

 

The year was 1981 when Yarbrough & Peoples released a dance anthem of the early 80’s with the song, “Don’t Stop The Music”. I remember, being a little girl and this was often played every time the radio was on WBLS and KISS FM in New York City in the house. The Dallas duo, released “Don’t Stop The Music” off their album The Two of Us.

Yarbrough and Peoples will go on to release more singles off their The Two of Us album, but it wasn’t as successful as their top charting “Don’t Stop The Music”, which has stood the test of time. “Don’t Stop The Music” reached #1 on the R&B charts.

One can also catch up on what Yarbough and Peoples are doing now, and some of their historic activities during the 80’s with the latest Unsung episode here.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: King of Swing – “Nod Your Head To This”

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King of Swing

The year was 1990 when the group King of Swing released the track, “Nod Your Head To This” off their only album entitled Strategy. The group consisted of Sugar Kay, Mike Master, and DJ Cocoa Chanelle. One couldn’t travel in NYC, without hearing this track blaring out of Volvos, Nissans and Wrangler jeeps. “Nod Your Head To This,” was part of the 1990 summer anthem.

King of Swing may have had a head nodding single, but their success was minimized, and Sugar Kay and Mike Master fell off to obscurity. One can’t find too much info on King of Swing, they appeared and contributed to the golden-age of hip-hop in a flash, and was gone as fast as they arrived.

Unlike her group members, DJ Cocoa Chanelle made a name for herself, as a DJ in the New York scene. Chanelle was the first woman to DJ for BET’s Teen Summit (whatever happened to that show?), and she secured a gig at Hot 97. It is a rarity that a woman spun for a group of men who rocked the mic. In fact, I don’t think that has been done after Chanelle (where are my hip hop scholars who dispute this?) Chanelle is hip-hop royalty, and even though King of Swing didn’t have a longevity on the hip-hop scene, their contribution to the genre should always be recognized.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Stevie Nicks – “Stand Back”

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Stevie Nicks

The year was 1983 when Stevie Nicks released “Stand Back” off her album entitled The Wild Heart. Nicks’ signature raspy voice contributed to a sound that would be a catalyst to Fleetwood Mac’s success during their time before she embarked on a successful solo career in the 80’s.

What makes “Stand Back” such a gem is that the late Prince contributed with production, which made “Stand Back” become not only a major hit for Nicks but added proof that whatever Prince touched, whether an addition of a synthesiser or songwriting, it turns to gold.

-Ms Scripter
Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: The Good Girls – “Your Sweetness”

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The Good Girls

The year was 1989 when the group The Good Girls released the single “Your Sweetness” off of their All for Your Love album. The trio, consisted of Shireen Crutchfield, Joyce Tolbert and DeMonica Santiago.

The group was affectionately called the 90’s version of The Supremes, but that would be a false narrative. Sure the group had a major hit and some notable mentions, but I wouldn’t appoint them anywhere near The Supremes level of talent. The only thing The Good Girls had that was equivalent to The Supremes is that they once shared the same label, which was Motown records.

The group would officially disband, but if one is an 80’s to 90’s baby this group would be remembered for their talent, but the comparisons to the other legendary group did them a disservice at the end.

“Your Sweetness” reached number six, on the R&B Billboard charts.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week Tribute: A Tribe Called Quest – “Oh My God”

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ATCQ

Used to have a crush on Dawn from En Vogue
It’s not like honey dip would wanna get with me
But just in case I own more condoms than T.L.C-Phife Dawg

There are times when I reminisce about my years in high school and can always identify with groups and artists, that paved the way to the soundtrack to my life. That is the case when it comes to A Tribe Called Quest. From the very beginnings of my teenage years, ATCQ were the blueprint, and I would continue to play their music, even when they had stopped making music together in the present.

With the news of the passing of one of the founding fathers of ATCQ in Malik Taylor who goes by the stage name Phife Dawg, something clicked inside of me. I felt a blanket of sadness because I knew the group would no longer be the same without the “five-foot assassin”. There have been too many instances lately, where parts of our golden-age of hip-hop legends have departed too soon. From Heavy D, Guru, and now Phife, the sudden death of these icons has left a residual feeling of grief though out the hip-hop community.

Phife’s contribution to the young genre has had a significant, profound impact on the hip-hop. From Phife’s witty lyricism and wordplay, he has had a definite influence on the new breed of rappers that have emerged. Phife Dawg will be missed, but never forgotten as he is forever embedded into the rafters of hip-hop royalty.

There are too many songs to choose from out of the ATCQ’s catalogue that would have made the old school video of the week. I have tons of favorites, like “Electric Relaxation”, “Scenario”, “God Lives Through” etc, l decided to go with “Oh My God” featuring Busta Rhymes off of ATCQ’s classic and downright epic album 1993 Midnight Marauders. Rest in peace Phife; you will be immensely missed.

 

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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