Old School Video of The Week: Prodigy – “Keep It Thoro”

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Prodigy

“When you see me in the streets soldier, salute me. You just a groupie, oh, you gangsta, then shoot me”

The unexpected death of Prodigy at the age of 42, of the group Mobb Deep, has rattled the hip-hop communities’ nerves. It’s starting to become normalized when we lose hip-hop icons at such a young age, and it also brings once again heath awareness with an emphasis on Black men in general. The exact cause of death has yet to be determined, but it is also well known that Prodigy has been battling sickle cell disease since he was an infant.

Prodigy’s entire aura, his voice, his lyrical delivery to coincide his street tales was intoxicating and Havoc’s lyrical contribution alongside with his stellar production, meshed well with Prodigy’s persona. Mobb Deep was an important duo when they emerged in the 90’s with a New York style, which left the bubble gum rap style in its dust, but came out and gave listeners a front row seat to the heart of the dark New York streets.

I was always fascinated by Prodigy’s voice, and I would state if he was at a supermarket and simply ask the cashier if an item was on sale, they would more than likely give him the items for free. Prodigy’s voice was one of the most intimidating voices in hip-hop, and it has Queensbridge all over it. When the duo disbanded, that didn’t stop Prodigy from continuing to get busy on the mic by representing hip-hop on his terms.

The year was 2000 when Prodigy released “Keep It Thoro” off his debut solo album H.N.I.C. “Keep It Thoro” is tough, a production banger, and it represented the Prodigy that we come to know and love as a member of Mobb Deep. Once again, leaving a legacy behind is just as important when we are no longer here in the physical. Prodigy did just that, in many ways. Another fallen hip-hop legend gave us a brief time on this earth, but left an infinite legacy behind that will be quite difficult to duplicate in the future. Rest in peace.

-Ms Scripter,

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week Tribute: A Tribe Called Quest – “Oh My God”

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ATCQ

Used to have a crush on Dawn from En Vogue
It’s not like honey dip would wanna get with me
But just in case I own more condoms than T.L.C-Phife Dawg

There are times when I reminisce about my years in high school and can always identify with groups and artists, that paved the way to the soundtrack to my life. That is the case when it comes to A Tribe Called Quest. From the very beginnings of my teenage years, ATCQ were the blueprint, and I would continue to play their music, even when they had stopped making music together in the present.

With the news of the passing of one of the founding fathers of ATCQ in Malik Taylor who goes by the stage name Phife Dawg, something clicked inside of me. I felt a blanket of sadness because I knew the group would no longer be the same without the “five-foot assassin”. There have been too many instances lately, where parts of our golden-age of hip-hop legends have departed too soon. From Heavy D, Guru, and now Phife, the sudden death of these icons has left a residual feeling of grief though out the hip-hop community.

Phife’s contribution to the young genre has had a significant, profound impact on the hip-hop. From Phife’s witty lyricism and wordplay, he has had a definite influence on the new breed of rappers that have emerged. Phife Dawg will be missed, but never forgotten as he is forever embedded into the rafters of hip-hop royalty.

There are too many songs to choose from out of the ATCQ’s catalogue that would have made the old school video of the week. I have tons of favorites, like “Electric Relaxation”, “Scenario”, “God Lives Through” etc, l decided to go with “Oh My God” featuring Busta Rhymes off of ATCQ’s classic and downright epic album 1993 Midnight Marauders. Rest in peace Phife; you will be immensely missed.

 

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Adele Paying Homage, May Force Nicki Minaj To Finally Rap Again

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Nicki Minaj

 

OPINION- Sometimes artists bring out the best in other artists, just by paying homage to another. Hopefully, in the case of Adele who was rhyming to Nicki Minaj’s “Monster” verse (with some extraordinary skills and hand gestures and all to match) will have some long term effects aimed at Minaj.

In all honesty, Minaj’s verse on “Monster” is argumentatively the best verse she has ever delivered on a mainstream level. In fact, Minaj’s verse are often repeated by critics as the best verse out of Kanye, Rick Ross and Jay-Z on the same song. That won’t get any argument from me because Minaj rode that beat with the voice changing with such precision, that I thought I was listening to another person.

The fact that Adele memorized it and paid homage to Minaj’s verse speaks volumes. Let’s be honest, Minaj released three albums not including her mixtapes over the past few years starting in 2010. Out of those albums, Adele chooses to recite a Minaj verse from Kanye’s My Dark Twisted Fantasy (2010) than any verse Minaj ever created on her own album.

It’s been six whole years since Minaj has dropped anything remotely close to a rap verse since “Monster”. What does that tell you? Minaj has become so pop; I think Minaj forgot she can rhyme. If one does not believe me, then check out a lot of Minaj’s mixtapes before she hit the mainstream circuit with Young Money; YouTube is my friend…

It’s frustrating because it appears Minaj rather dumb it down with her lyrics, and not stay true to herself and show her fans that she has the arsenal lyrically to be deemed a great female emcee. As far as I’m concerned, the only thing great about Minaj is that she had an excellent verse on a single, which even Adele still remembers off of an album, which wasn’t even Minaj’s. That’s not a good look at all and makes Minaj appear to be lazy lyrically.

I would like to see Minaj get back in that studio and dropped a full fledge pure hip-hop album, that would shut me up. I mean I pick on her because I know she can bring the heat better than she has been since coming into the mainstream game. To be as mediocre as Minaj’s has demonstrated is doing a disservice to other female emcees who have come before her and put in that work. It’s time for Nicki Minaj, to rap like that “monster” again, or we are just going to have to settle for rhyming over one Minaj verse for the rest of our lives as remembrance.

Check out the link below, as Adele with the hand gestures and all,  she sings and rhymes over various songs:

[SOURCE]

Ms. Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Antoinette – “Who’s The Boss”

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whosthebossThe year was 1989 when rapper Antoinette released “Who’s The Boss”, off her album with the same name. The Queens native secured points with me immediately with this title track, and became part of the wave of other female emcees who dominated the microphone in a crowd of men.

Antoinette’s crafty hardcore flow and overall no non-sense attitude was her signature during the Golden-Age of hip-hop.  At times, Antoinette was compared to Big Daddy Kane or Rakim, which was flattering considering they were one of the elites in that decade. Antoinette may not have had a long career like her rival MC Lyte (“10% Diss” may be the cause of that short career), but she secured a place in the genre that gave her just enough shine to never be forgotten.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Boogie Down Productions – “The Bridge is Over”

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Boogie+Down+ProductionsThe year was 1987 when Boogie Down Productions, came out with one of the most important and historic diss records in hip-hop with “The Bridge is Over”. I remember being a 7th grader in Junior High School 113 and coming back to school and all we would talk about is how Boogie Down Productions came out and destroyed the borough of Queens, which their primary targets was MC Shane, Marley Marl, and Roxanne Shante, who were part of the Juice Crew. The bridge wars remain the catalyst on how hip-hop beef remains on wax and does not go in the streets with violence, but with mic skills.

There are heavy rumors that some of the crew from Boogie Down Productions stoled Marley Marl’s drum machine, which was subsequently used to create “The Bridge Is Over” production. That is still up for debate, but Marley Marl thinks so and with his interview that he did on the Combat Jack Show he proclaim that same theory.

With the recent talk of the Meek Mills versus Drake beef (which appears one-sided as of right now), it made me think of what a diss record was all about. Boogie Down Productions not only captivated a hip-hop community, but also solidified their role as one of the most prominent and respected hip-hop crews led by legendary KRS-One that has ever come out of the Bronx in the late 80’s.

-Ms Scipter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Queen Latifah – “Just Another Day”

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Black Reign

“Stomach ache, head to Steak-N-Take for a bean pie.

Get a Final Call from the brother in the bow tie.

 I’m where little kids, dream, and fiend for fun

Lots of laughter, moms, no pops playing with her son

I passed by a girl’s wake, they say she died at seven

Hit by a stray, but I pray that there’s a hood in heaven

Fake brothers claim there’s no shame in their game

You know my name, show me a real nig*a with a brain

So it’s back to the block, time to play

It’s just another day around the way, hey.”-Queen Latifah

The year was 1993 when Queen Latifah released, “Just Another Day”, off of her album Black Reign. This song is reminiscent of the time on the block in the Fall specifically and has the nostalgia to match. Co-written by the late Apache, “Just Another Day”, which was a nice little anthem to coincide with Queen’s other single, “U.N.I.T.Y” had a lay back vibe to it.

I sure do miss this type of hip-hop with an emphasis on women that rock the microphone, with class and elegance. Hopefully, without the nakedness, just cool out lyrics minus the overabundance of sexuality make a huge comeback in the future.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of the Week: MC Trouble – “Wanna Make You Mine”

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mc-trouble-cover

The year was 1990 when MC Trouble released the song, “Wanna Make You Mine” off her debut album Gotta Get A Grip. MC Trouble was the first woman signed to Motown under the rap genre and “Wanna Make You Mine” proved to be a big hit. “Wanna Make You Mine” reached #15 on the Billboard rap charts.

I was sure MC Trouble would have a long career (until the rap artists entire persona and lyrics replicate a porn video) that she would have a long luscious career. Unfortunately, we will never know because MC Trouble died in her sleep after suffering from an epileptic seizure, which caused heart failure at the tender age of 21.

Hopefully, we will never forget MC Trouble’s brief contribution to the genre and new hip hop fans can check out the rest of her body of work.

-Ms Scripture

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of the Week: Public Enemy – “911 is a Joke”

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Public EnemyThe year was 1990 when Public Enemy released “911 Is a Joke”, off of their Fear of a Black Plane album. Flavor Flav who rarely has the opportunity to leave from hype-man to front man took over the mic with this one, as he animatedly let’s everyone know 911 is a joke. The video has more of a comedic stance compared to other Public Enemy videos, but the message remains the same when it involves socially conscious issues that plague more importantly, the urban community.

The track and the video is eerily the same in the present, (without the comedy involved) that 911 is a joke. More importantly, it highlights EMT workers who fail to provide medical attention when arriving at scenes when they are called for assistance. Take Eric Garner for instance who was killed by the police last week. To allow a man to lay motionless without providing him any oxygen, or give him CPR goes without saying that they are a joke.

“911 is a Joke” was written by Flavor Flav and reached #1 on the hip-hop singles chart and that’s no joke.

-Ms Scripter
Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?


Public Enemy : 911 is a joke by BLACKMUSICS

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Old School Video of the Week: Run-D.M.C. feat. Pete Rock and Cl Smooth – “Down With the King”

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run_DMCThe year was 1993, when Run-D.M.C. featuring Pete Rock and C.L. Smooth released the track “Down With the King” off the album with the same name. This video showcases everyone in hip hop from a variety of demographics, which made this video one of my favorites. I call “Down with the King” a comeback single for the group since hip-hop was changing rapidly. Produced by legendary Pete Rock and Jermaine Dupri, this single will be the 2nd biggest commercial hit of their careers.

DJ Jam Master Jay’s birthday was this week, so not only is this an appropriate birthday shout out, but regardless of what is transpiring in hip-hop today, Run-D.M.C and Jam Master Jay are still one of the Kings of rap.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

 

 

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Parents, Don’t Let Chief Keef Raise Your Kids – He Supports Murder!

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Chief-KeefOPINION – Rap has taken shape from helping gangs get off the street, by providing them an outlet to showcase their talent in the Boogie Down Bronx. It transformed to a fun time from break dancing, graffiti artists, party fun lyrics, to a socially conscious element and then gangster rap came aboard with their share of homophobic and misogynist lyrics as the years progress. Recently, we are now in the dumb down age of hip hop with some of the new breed that have been given the opportunity to handle the mic and spread their rhetoric to the youth. For example, rapper Chief Keef.

I personally don’t listen to Chief Keef, I don’t want my brain cells to become compromise. I just feel if I listen to a syllable of his words my cells would become null and void.  I avoid him like the plague, just like I avoid artist like Lil’ Wayne – they both cut from the same cloth as being unapologetic-ally ignorant. I never phantom that I will be giving Chief Keef my time, by placing my thoughts on him on paper until recently.

Chief Keef made one of the most disturbing statements concerning his music. Chief Keef enthusiastically from his Instagram account stated the following:

“Bang 2 And Almighty So On ITunes Right Now But Bang 3 No Lie Y’all Really Don’t know How crazy Im goin #ImFinnaRaiseTheMurderRateUp”.

The ignorance concerning this sorry excuse for a rapper is deafening. Chef Keef is from Chi-town, which this city leads the United States in the deadly statistic of murder. Why would this guy even attempt to boast that his music will make the murder rate escalate even higher? The only definitive answer, is that he is misguided, and was raised with the socially conscious element of a serial killer. He is also being heavily endorsed by white supremacy known as the suits in hip hop. Everything that is negative pertaining to Black people in the entertainment world, white supremacist have their hands in it. Racism is still alive and well, they just make it more covert and subtle, which is tens times effective. They also allow a mascot like Chief Keef to spread their message to dumb one down.

It gets even worse:

Saturday night, Chief Keef was the talk of Twitter and Instagram, as the Chi-town rapper posted an x-rated picture of him “#GettinTip”. Instagram got wind of the picture that Keef had posted and removed it and his account, which pissed him off.

“F**k instagram dey took my s**t again #300.”

Back in August T.I hinted at how record companies, want to broadcast an image of thuggery and behavior that is outright embarrassing:

“Labels love hardcore T.I. That keeps the cash register ringing. They don’t want me to go to prison and caught though. They want me to be the Teflon Don, and I can’t blame them,” he said, likely referring to Gambino Family mob boss John Gotti’s longtime nickname. “That sh*t’s sexy. But I’m older, man. I’m wiser, I’m calmer… I’m better, stronger. I’m ready for whatever tomorrow got coming.”

Even T.I. knows when he is being used to project an image of downright ignorance. Chief Keef obviously needs some guidance, he is only 17 year old!

This is where a the parents of a young, hip hop fan comes in; parents are responsible for raising their kids. Do not allow Chief Keef to be the one teaching your child about the rules of engagement in what we call life. We are giving these entertainers too much power when we let our children become influence by them. We run the risk of having children conduct themselves in a matter that may results in death, or life behind bars. Chief Keef’s public display of ignorance should be a teachable moment.  Sit down with your child and talk about negative imagery and entertainers like him. Go over the consequences one will have to face when one decides to participate in violent acts or sheer buffoonery.

Fortunately for me, when I was listening to hip hop as an teen, I was listening to the safe artists like LL Cool J, RUN-DMC, then I went the socially conscious route with the likes of Public Enemy. By the time the white supremacist in the suits gave us NWA, I knew better. Negative hip hop was frown upon in my household. One of the things that have stuck with me is that my mother didn’t act like my best friend, she taught me self-respect and voice  her displeasure pertaining to negative hip hop. I have been blessed that during that time The Cosby Show and A Different World was also on television. So the positive imagery and guidance I seen back then was set, compared to the overwhelming amount of negative imagery that is being exposed to our youth in the present.  Today’s youth have Chief Keef, and that is indeed scary, but it will only be traumatic to the parents if one allows a rapper, reality shows, or any other form of negative entertainment to raise their kids – instead of you raising them yourself. People in general will only do what you allow, and that goes for the guidance in how one handles their children throughout their adolescent life.

I wouldn’t allow Chief Keef anywhere near my children, or have them expose to reality shows that promotes a variety of baby mothers, fathers, infidelity and just embarrassing and downright catastrophic behavior. How your child responds to these negative forces is entirely up to how they are raised, let’s just hope one does not allow Chief Keef to obtain that sort of power.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

infoforthemasses@gmail.com

 

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