Old School Video of The Week: Soul II Soul – “Keep On Movin'”

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Soul II Soul

The year was 1989 when Soul II Soul released “Keep On Movin'”, which was performed by Caron Wheeler off the group’s album Club Classics Vol. One. “Keep On Movin'” was the most successful single, from the group that skyrocketed on the Billboard US R&B charts.

Written and produced by one of the most underrated producers of the 90’s in Jazzie B, made this group one of the most memorable of the era. Jazzie B, who was born and raised in London, was able to cross successfully over into the States by having created a sound that was enthusiastically embraced. Furthermore, Jazzie B would go on to produce for artists and groups like Public Enemy, Maxi Priest, Nas and the late Teena Marie, just to name a few.

The summer of 89′ has been forever embedded in my mind when this song was released. It brings back memories, of when I didn’t have to be concerned about adult situations, but just having fun growing up in Brooklyn. “Keep on Movin'” was one of the summer anthems of that year, and it will always be one of my favorites from the group.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week – New Edition: “My Secret (Didja Gitit Yet?)”

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New Edition My Secret

The year was 1984 when New Edition teamed up with some NBA players from the L.A. Lakers at the time for the video to “My Secret (Didja Gitit Yet?)”. The single was off of their second album self-entitled, New Edition. “My Secret (Didja Gitit Yet?” ended up at #100 on the Billboard charts with little fanfare, due to the four other hits, the group were able to manufacture previously.

New Edition would embark on an illustrious career that would bring them success as solo artists, and other groups that were created into adulthood. One would argumentatively be one best boy groups of the 80’s and 90’s.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video Of The Week: Natalie Cole – “This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)”

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Natalie ColeThe year was 1975 when Natalie Cole released the single, “This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)” off her debut album Inseparable. The daughter of the late Nat King Cole made an immediate impact on the music industry, where at the time was dominated by Aretha Franklin. Cole was able to have a successful debut single, which earned her a Grammy award the next year. The success of “This Will Be” would be transferred into the present, where the song was featured on soundtracks for the movie, The Parent Trap (1998), Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle (2003) and many more.

Cole would go on to have a successful career and made an even bigger impact with her duet she was able to do in the form of brilliant technology with her father on the remake of “Unforgettable” (1991). Even with the success of Cole’s career, her life had it’s ups and downs and her very public battle with substance abuse and other health related issues would be highlighted. Unfortunately, the start of 2016 began with the sad news of Natalie Cole’s death at 65 years old. Cole will forever be known as a legend, who began a career in the late 70’s and made a comeback of her own, throughout the years both professionally and personally. Cole’s story is fascinating and inspiring, and she will be greatly missed.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of The Week: Sybil – “Don’t Make Me Over”

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SybilThe year was 1988 when Sybil did a re-make of Dionne Warrick’s classic “Don’t Make Me Over”. Sybil’s rendition of the song featured a more New Jack Swing flavor that sets it apart from other remakes of the same song. “Don’t Make Me Over” reached #2 on the R&B Billboard charts.

Sybil’s cover of a Dionne Warrick track, wouldn’t be the last time. Sybil did it again in 1989 with the Warrick’s cover of “Walk on By” with additional success.

-Ms Scripter
Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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A Dark Complexion Will Get You Zero Protection With The Police

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Police-ShootingBy now, the world has seen one of the most disturbing videos where a Black man who was just following a request by an officer of the law, almost ended up as a corpse at the morgue for his trouble. South Carolina is the place where the rules of engagement (according to some officers who’s actions don’t value a human life or shall I say a Black life) takes place. The victim in this case is Levar Jones, and what happens next is almost a daily occurrence. Where police brutality involves anyone of color pertaining to police interactions (even though this has occurred since the Slave Patrols, but I digress) is the norm.

Jones pulled into a gas station and as he was getting out a police officer attempted to pull him over and asked to see his driver’s license. Allegedly Jones did not have his seat belt on and the officer wanted to issue him a ticket. This is not victim blaming at all, but I’m going to point out that Black men and women must be very conscious of their movements when it involves the police. This is especially true when the police officer one is interacting with is white. Jones, who was already out of his vehicle when the officer attempt to stop him, was not really thinking his life would be in danger. After the request was made by the officer t0 see his license, Jones reached back into his vehicle to retrieve his identification and was shot by State Trooper Sean M. Groubert. A total of four shots were discharged from Groubert’s weapon, hitting Jones once. Cleary on the police dash cam, one can hear Jones asking Groubert why did the trooper shoot him and that he was just retrieving his identification. Jones must know by now the answer to his question, especially when incidents like shoot first ask questions later, happens mainly to Black men and women.

At least in this case the State Trooper was fired and arrested and charged with felony assault (imagine if the police officers in the Michael Brown and Eric Garner case would receive that same punishment so expeditiously?)

What is troubling to me is that many people appeared to think that the police assaulting and killing Black people is something that is starting to become an epidemic. No, this has been going on for centuries and the fact that a lot of these police brutality cases now have a witness is a plus. The camera phone and in this case the dash cam has assisted many non-believers to the level of the brutality that many Black people will face if they even bat an eyelash against a police officer.

Can one imagine if there were no dash cam to Jones’ incident? Then the trooper would get the benefit of the doubt, by a grand jury and more than likely would continue to work as a police officer and finish tormenting more Black people for the rest of his career. Of course, cameras of incidents do not always equate justice, and that is evident by the simple Simon ruling by an all-white grand jury in the John Crawford case. In case one missed this one, Crawford was shot and killed by the police while holding a toy gun while walking in an aisle in Walmart. Jonathan didn’t point a gun at the officers (because he didn’t even see them; he was talking to the mother of his children at the time, with his back turned to them). Despite the erroneous call by a witness who stated Crawford was pointing a gun at customers (that was deemed to be false, according to the video) the police shot him regardless. What makes Crawford’s case more disturbing is that a grand jury failed to indict theses responding officers who arrived at the scene, and they didn’t take into consideration that Ohio has an open carry law.

Hypothetically if the gun Crawford has was real, how come the police didn’t approach him and question him about it? Instead, they shot him dead like a dog in the street because we all know Black men carrying guns is surely a threat to society right? No matter the laws that are in place where open carry laws allows citizens to walk around with an assault rifle while browsing in aisle nine without any repercussions from the police. It’s just that these open carry laws seem to be null and void if a person of color is carrying one.

The legal standard for whether or not deadly force by a police officer is “justifiable” often relies upon an officer’s subjective “feeling” of being threatened, which means that an officer who “feels” that young, African-American men are threatening by their very nature may have a more lax standard of when use of deadly force is acceptable against them.

After the grand jury failed to return indictments in the Walmart shooting, the United States Justice Department said it would conduct its own investigation to determine whether Crawford’s civil rights were violated when police shot and killed him.

Black people better realize (you to my Latino friends) the rules of engagement will not be used correctly when they interact with us. The police guide is tossed out of the window, because the rules of engagement is different, and it has always been that way when you’re a person of color. Don’t even think about one’s family receiving justice if one happens to die by the hands of police officers unjustly. Society has the police officers receiving the benefit of the doubt the majority of the time. The make up of grand jury pools are often design to ensure these same police officers will not be prosecuted, and it’s not like the prosecutor wants a police officer to be punished. The victim’s family will receive compensation, and that’s about it. A paid suspension and a loss of some vacation days will be the right call (according to police culture, when an officer doesn’t follow procedures and someone ends up dead).

If one wants better prosecutors, police commissioners, and an entire overhaul change in the way the criminal justice is structure. Then one has to be politically educated on politics in order to have a voice in this process. What many people in the position of power are hoping for is that Blacks and Latinos will blindly vote for any Democrat (since we always voting for them) and not read their voting record or where they stand on police reform. The more one votes for these politicians that do not tell us where they stand on police brutality and the militarization of police forces, the more they will obtain the power and continue to ignore the problem. Police officers (who don’t abide by their laws) continue to get away with murder, literally and figuratively. It’s time to wake up, and get politically educated!

If one didn’t see this disturbing viral video concerning Levar Jones, check it out below:

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of the Week: Public Enemy – “911 is a Joke”

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Public EnemyThe year was 1990 when Public Enemy released “911 Is a Joke”, off of their Fear of a Black Plane album. Flavor Flav who rarely has the opportunity to leave from hype-man to front man took over the mic with this one, as he animatedly let’s everyone know 911 is a joke. The video has more of a comedic stance compared to other Public Enemy videos, but the message remains the same when it involves socially conscious issues that plague more importantly, the urban community.

The track and the video is eerily the same in the present, (without the comedy involved) that 911 is a joke. More importantly, it highlights EMT workers who fail to provide medical attention when arriving at scenes when they are called for assistance. Take Eric Garner for instance who was killed by the police last week. To allow a man to lay motionless without providing him any oxygen, or give him CPR goes without saying that they are a joke.

“911 is a Joke” was written by Flavor Flav and reached #1 on the hip-hop singles chart and that’s no joke.

-Ms Scripter
Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?


Public Enemy : 911 is a joke by BLACKMUSICS

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Old School Video of the Week: The Brand New Heavies – “Never Stop”

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The Brand New HeaviesThe year was 1990 when the UK group The Brand New Heavies dropped their single, “Never Stop” off their debut simply entitled Brand New Heavies. N’Dea Davenport took the lead as the main vocalist which the single resulted in minor success right here in the U.S. A lot of U.K. artists in the 90’s were able to have some cross over appeal here in the states. The 90’s were a pivotal point for a lot of these bands to add new American fans, like the group Soul II Soul.

The Brand New Heavies have a combination of Neo-Soul, R&B, and hip-hop to their body of work. It’s unfortunate that in the U.S. we didn’t give them our full attention, and it appears only the success of their singles like”Never Stop” created some American fans, but not enough like they would achieved in the U.K. The ever changing of their lead singers cause me to move on to other bands. Either way, The Brand New Heavies cemented their place as one of the classic sounds of the 90’s via the U.K. experience.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of the Week: Roxanne Shante – “Live on Stage”

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Roxanne ShanteThe year was 1989 when Roxanne Shante dropped the single off her Bad Sister album, “Live on Stage.” Back by the iconic producer Marley Marl and the Juice Crew, Shante was one of the first female rappers who garner respect in a field that is dominated by men. The Queensbridge diva broke a lot of barriers like other female emcees. It‘s unfortunate Shante didn’t garner the same success as Brooklyn born MC Lyte, but she earned the respect of a lot of hip-hop fans along the way.

The way the female emcee has developed has changed dramatically over the years. We went from rhyming about women empowerment, fun battle songs, etc. Now today’s female rappers rhyme about how well they can sex the next dude, or just dumb down the environment with gibberish. Times have changed, this is why it is exhilarating to go back in time and relive those moments when the female emcee wasn’t about just sexual explicitness but about actual skills on the mic, minus the sexual nature of their lyrics.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

 

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Old School Video of the Week: Rob Base & D.J.E-Z Rock – “It Takes Two”

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robbaseanddjezrockThe sudden death of D.J. E-Z Rock left many of us shocked and with an enormous amount of sadness. It appears many of our hip-hop icons are passing away at an early age. It is now known that Rodney “Skip” Bryce aka D.J. E-Z Rock died way too young (46 years old) of complications from diabetes.

The old school video of the week is appropriately appointed to Rob Base & D.J. EZ-Rock, with their classic anthem “It Takes Two.” If one were to visit the club and this record comes on many people inside of it (of all ages) will go crazy. That is how impactful that record is to many old school hip-hop fans and new ones.

“Skip was a joker. He was a good DJ, but everybody just loved him for who he was; just a funny guy. He was always quick to make friends, no matter where he was. He was just that type of guy.” – Rob Base, Interview with Rolling Stone Magazine

D.J. E-Z Rock’s legacy has been forever embedded into hip-hop as one of the icons, legends of the Golden era of the genre, and he will be immensely missed.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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Old School Video of the Week: Biz Marke – “Spring Again”

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The Biz Never SleepsThe year was 1989 when Biz Markie released the track “Spring Again”, off the album The Biz Never Sleeps. The album was a success, but unfortunately, Biz Markie failed to clear various samples off this album, which led to lawsuits for copy write infringement. One of the samples that are visible in this track is Roberta Flack and Donnie Hathaway’s “Back Together Again” among other samples used for this single. When looking back, the use of samples without clearances led to numerous consequences for many artists.

“Spring Again”, which is appropriate especially this time of year where New Yorkers are looking forward to the sunshine, flowers, shedding winter coats and hats. Let’s just hope we can say “it’s spring again” and really mean it.

-Ms Scripter

Just blogging for the masses, ya dig?

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